Category Slavery

Liberty and Union

This book by Professor David Herbert Donald, published in 1978, provides us his interpretation of the Civil War and Reconstruction. He writes, “In studying the years from 1845 to about 1890 as a whole, I have become convinced that these important economic, social, and ideological conflicts can best be understood as special instances of a […]

Black Soldiers and the Transnational Civil War

This is a fine podcast by A. J. Cade on the history of African American militia in New Orleans, Louisiana and the Louisiana Native Guards in the Civil War, along with Benjamin Butler’s influence on them and the international reaction to Back United States soldiers. The episode’s description reads, “AJ Cade II on Black Soldiers […]

Battle of Antietam, Lincoln and Emancipation

Here’s Scott Hartwig giving a characteristically excellent presentation at the Emerging Civil War symposium on the Emancipation and the Maryland Campaign of 1862. The video’s description reads, “Scott Hartwig, the former supervisory historian at Gettysburg National Military Park, talked about the lead up to the September 1862 Battle of Antietam and Abraham Lincoln’s announcing the preliminary Emancipation […]

Calculating the Value of the Union

This book by Professor James L. Huston is an excellent look at the economic origins of the Civil War. In the Preface he tells us, “My initial starting point several decades ago was that the source of the conflict had to be economic, for the basic function of slavery was to provide cheap labor. Tying […]

It’s one of the most radical and prophetic speeches in American history. And hardly anyone knows about it

This article by John Blake of CNN tells us, “In mid-19th-century America, when public speaking was a form of mass entertainment, Frederick Douglass was a rock star. Standing-room-only crowds greeted him in the US and in Europe. People wept as he recounted the horrors of slavery or erupted in laughter as he mimicked his former slave master. […]

Sacred Trust Talks 2022 | Dr. Scott Hancock

Here’s an excellent talk by Professor Scott Hancock at the 2022 Sacred Trust Talks at Gettysburg National Military Park. The video’s description reads, “‘Weapons of the Weak: The Underground Railroad and How the Most Powerless People in the United States Caused the Civil War’ by Gettysburg College Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies Dr. […]

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE ESCAPED SLAVES WHEN HARPERS FERRY FELL TO STONEWALL JACKSON?

This article from America’s Civil War magazine discusses the fate of escaped enslaved people who wee at Harpers Ferry in September of 1862 when it fell to Stonewall Jackson’s troops. “The principal story of Maj. Gen. Thomas J. ‘Stonewall’ Jackson’s victory at Harpers Ferry on September 15, 1862, is already well-known. Two days before the epic Battle of […]

Sacred Trust Talks 2022 | Dr. Scott Hancock

Here’s Professor Scott Hancock giving a terrific talk on the Undergound Railroad as part of the 2022 Sacred Trust talks at Gettysburg National Military Park. The video’s description reads, “‘Weapons of the Weak: The Underground Railroad and How the Most Powerless People in the United States Caused the Civil War’ by Gettysburg College Associate Professor […]

Seven Myths of the Civil War

This book, edited by Professor Wesley Moody, contains seven essays, each of which center on a specific myth surrounding the Civil War. The Introduction tells us, “One common and reasonable criticism of modern historians is that we overspecialize. In the case of the Civil War, we often over-sub-specialize, and this can lead to problems in […]

Conference on slave rebellions offers in-depth way to teach history some don’t want in schools

This article tells us about the Slave Dwelling Project in South Carolina. “As the campaign to quash the teachings of America’s brutal history of slavery intensifies, Joseph McGill Jr. has waged a counterattack by way of a poignant three-day conference in this antebellum port town that was once responsible for the most sales and transports […]