Category Historians

CWTR Episode 1907: National Archives / Alliance to Preserve the Civil War Defenses of Washington / Re-enactor

Here’s a terrific conversation between host Professor Gerald Prokopowicz and his guest, Bryan Cheeseboro of the National Archives.

CWTR Episode 1906: The Heart of Hell: The Soldiers Struggle for Spotsylvanias Bloody Angle

Here’s a terrific conversation between host Professor Gerald Prokopowicz and his guest Jeffry Wert on Mr. Wert’s latest book, The Heart of Hell.

CWRT Episode 1904: The Record of Murders and Outrages: Racial Violence and the Fight over Truth at the Dawn of Reconstruction

Here’s an excellent interview between host Professor Gerald Prokopowicz and his guest, Professor William Blair on Professor Blair’s recent book, The Record of Murders and Outrages.

2022 Dedication Day and Remembrance Day

This year, with November 19 falling on Saturday, Dedication Day, commemorating the Gettysburg Battlefield’s National Cemetery’s dedication in 1863, along with Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, and Remembrance Day, an annual parade of Civil War reenactors, are on the same day, making for a long day. Remembrance Day parking and closures 2022. NOTE: More roads will […]

Heather Cox Richardson explains Lincoln’s “House Divided” Speech

In this episode, “Professor Buzzkill,” aka Professor Joseph Coohill, plays an excerpt of Professor Heather Cox Richardson discussing Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech. The episode’s descriptio reads, “Did Abraham Lincoln actually say ‘a house divided against itself cannot stand’? We place that quote in its historical context. And Dr. Heather Cox Richardson gives us a […]

CWTR Episode 1903: Gettysburg 1963: Civil Rights, Cold War Politics, and Historical Memory in Americas Most Famous Small Town

Here’s an excellent discussion between host Professor Gerald Prokopowicz and his guest, Proessor Jill Ogline Titus, about Professor Titus’s book, Gettysburg, 1963: Civil Rights, Cold War Politics, and Historical Memory in Americas Most Famous Small Town.

How Gettysburg Inspired Modern War Gaming

This article from Military History Quarterly showed up in my feed today. “Charles Swann Roberts, ‘the father of board war-gaming,’ was born in Baltimore on February 3, 1930, and grew up just outside the city in Catonsville. Two fascinations dominated his childhood. One was the military. He once recalled how he and his young friends […]

Professor Kevin Kruse Cleared of Misconduct Charges

After Philip Magness made accusations of plagiarism against Professor Kruse, both Cornell University, which granted Kruse his Ph.D., and Princeton University, his current employer, conducted investigations into the charges. Both those investigations are now concluded, and Professor Kruse has been cleared of misconduct. Professor Kruse tweeted this letter from Cornell: Additionally, he tweeted this statement […]

What the 1836 Project Leaves Out in Its Version of Texas History

Imitations rarely achieve the exposure the originals achieve, especially when they are poor imitations, like Gov. Greg Abbott’s silly “1836 Project.” This article gives us some of the weaknesses of that piece of propaganda. “A popular joke in the Soviet Union went like this: ‘The future is certain. Only the past is unpredictable.’ The quip poked […]

How white supremacy became part of nation’s fabric

I came across this article in the Harvard Gazette. It’s an excerpt from Dr. Donald Yacovone’s new book, Teaching White Supremacy: America’s Democratic Ordeal and the Forging of Our National Identity. “Several years ago I began a study of the antislavery movement’s legacy. I focused on the century after 1865 to understand how the ‘collective’ […]